I recently attended a great symposium for time researchers in Tokyo. It was a fantastic to have a chance to exchange thoughts about new theories of psychological time and to see some very elegant experiments. The conference website is here: Time in Tokyo Symposium. For the Symposium, I prepared a theoretical discussion of the specious present, considering how we may explore neurophenomenology with reference to recent neuroscientic findings. The slides for the talk are available here:

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NDVI is an acronym for Normalised Difference Vegetation Index. It’s a very interesting measure of plant photosynthesis and health derived from measuring the difference in near-infrared and visual reflectance. I’ve recently been exploring its use for plant monitoring; here are a few calibration images. [NDVI=\frac{NIR-VIS}{NIR+VIS}] The original image is on the left, with NDVI on the right These images were shot using a full-spectrum modified Sony A7 camera with OM Zuiko 21mm/3.

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Publishing fMRI results usually involves the presentation of slice images that show regions of increased BOLD (Blood Oxygen Dependent Signal). However, fMRI data is inherently three dimensional and often it is difficult to visualise or appropriately present data in 2D formats. Therefore, it can be useful to implement a method for displaying graphics in 3D form. Luckily, there are some good javascript libraries that interact with the HTML5 canvas attribute to present 3D objects.

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Psychophysics experiments often require passing messages and signals between different computers and devices. There are a number of methods that are generally used and the limitations of these methods are often a source of consternation for researchers. Experiments designed to probe human temporal perception are particularly sensitive to timing errors in the apparatus. Therefore we have been developing a high resolution signal acquisition device for sending and receiving signals and doing some basic processing.

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Recently, our lab has been working on a general timing measurement system to ensure that psychophysical timing of experiments is valid with different experimental setups ranging from calibrated lab CRT monitors to LCD projectors in MRI facilities. Essentially, we aim to have a portable and easy to use recorder of digital and analogue signals that can be analysed for delays in hardware and software as well as jitter in various parameters.

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Francesco Giorlando

Musings on Research, Tech and Medicine
Dr Giorlando is a clinician-scientist with interests in neuroscience, psychophysics, addiction and temporal perception. He implements high-performance computing and electronic systems for research and enjoys hacking with digital media and sustainable technologies.

Scientist and Clinician

Melbourne, Australia